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Contraceptive Choices—seeking effective, convenient, safe and ovulation-friendly birth control

Our primary goal when choosing a reversible birth control method is that it effectively prevent pregnancy, is without personal unwanted side-effects and is affordable and convenient. CeMCOR believes we should add a second goal—that the effective/safe chosen contraceptive method also preserves normal menstrual cycles and ovulation.

Type: 
Articles

Ovulatory Disturbances: They Do Matter

For the woman who isn't trying to get pregnant, does it matter if an ovulatory pattern is normal? Recent studies indicate that it does. One study showed that women with only one nonovulatory cycle a year lost an average of 4% of their spinal bone. Strong evidence suggests that lack of cyclic normal progesterone is detrimental to good health.

Type: 
Articles

Preventive Powers of Ovulation and Progesterone

This series of articles, originally published in the CeMCOR newsletter, illustrate the importance of ovulation throughout women's reproductive life. The articles explain what ovulation is and address some of the issues and implications of ovulatory disturbances.

Type: 
Articles

Documenting Ovulation with Quantitative Basal Temperature (QBT)

If our cycles are regular - about a month apart we assume we are ovulatory - meaning releasing an egg and making normal amounts of progesterone. However, ovulation is highly variable for all women. Progesterone raises our first morning (or basal) temperature a little bit. But so do many other things. Thus "basal body temperature" (BBT) charts, even with mid-cycle stretchy mucus (symptothermal methods) may not be accurate for predicting ovulation. Therefore we developed a valid and scientific use of basal temperature called "Quantitative Basal Temperature" (QBT) to assess ovulation and the luteal phase length (number of days of progesterone elevation).

Type: 
Handout

Manipulating Menstruation with Hormonal Contraception — what does the Science say?

Articles and magazine reports and even books about so-called “menstrual suppression” describe taking the Pill continuously or for longer than 21 days with seven days off. The advertising suggests that this is giving women a “choice” to do away with menstrual flow or menstrual problems. The Federal Drug Agency in the USA has approved one oral combined hormonal contraceptive to be taken in four extended cycles a year. These new ways of taking the Pill allow companies a new patent on old drugs and make it likely that the market for these products will expand from those who want to control pregnancy to those who want to eliminate menstrual flow.

Type: 
Articles

Midlife Muddle - Own the Power of Naming

Dr Jerilynn Prior discusses the accurate naming of women's midlife transition and what to look for to define whether you're perimenopausal.

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause

Menstrual Cycle Diary

Use this diary if you are an adolescent or premenopausal woman.
You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to read and print them. If you don't already have this program, you can download it for free.

Type: 
Diary

Daily Perimenopause Diary

For perimenopausal women, including women with regular cycles who have hot flushes or night sweats
You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to read and print them. If you don't already have this program, you can download it for free.

Type: 
Diary
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause

Help for Anovulatory Androgen Excess (AAE)—Challenge PCOS!

Answering questions about “polycystic ovary syndrome” (also called PCOS but which CeMCOR calls Anovulatory Androgen Excess or AAE) and exploring new and helpful information about this mysterious condition.

Type: 
Articles

Menstrual Cycle Diary Instructional Videos

In this four-part series, Dr. Jerilynn Prior, founder of the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research, and a diverse panel of women discuss the importance of the menstrual cycle to a woman's overall health and explains how to keep track of your cycle using the Menstrual Cycle Diary.

Type: 
Video

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Join a Study:

Enrolment complete: Perimenopausal Hot Flush Study

Enrolment is now complete. Thank you for your interest.
CeMCOR is now recruiting Canadian women for this CIHR-funded randomized controlled trial to test whether oral micronized progesterone is more effective than placebo as therapy for hot flushes and night sweats in perimenopausal women.

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Get Involved

Volunteer research participants are the heart of all CeMCOR research. Participants are invited to provide feedback on study processes, to learn their own results and at the end of a study, be the first to hear what the whole study found. Please become a CeMCOR research participant—you can contribute to improving the scientific information available for daughters, friends and the wider world of women.